Home Reports UN: All Libyan factions violated the International Law

UN: All Libyan factions violated the International Law

484
0
SHARE
Internet

The United Nations accused all sides in Libya’s armed conflict of violating international laws that may amount to war crimes.

Joint report by the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights and the UN Support Mission in Libya said that all parties to the conflict are violating international laws by committing indiscriminate attacks against civilians, including summary executions, arbitrary imprisonment and use of torture.

The report, issued Monday, stated that politicians and commanders of armed groups are liable to prosecution by the International Criminal Court,ICC, pointing that it was already investigating the situation.

“Many migrants, asylum seekers and refugees become victims of brutal violence, coercion and abuse perpetrated by smugglers along smuggling routes, as well as in so-called ‘connection houses’, where they await departure to Europe,” the report said.

The joint report also accused warring factions of using imprecise weaponry in populated areas, and committing indiscriminate attacks causing rise in civilian deaths and damage to infrastructure including hospitals.

The IS crimes 

The report focused on crimes committed by the Islamic State, IS, inside Libya, saying that the group committed gross abuses including public summary executions and beheadings of individuals based on their religion or political allegiance. Some victims were accused of treason, others accused of same sex relations, the UN said that none of the victims were given due legal process.

The UN had documented the IS executions in their stronghold city of Sirte, in central Libya along the Mediterranean coast, and in Derna to the east, from which they were later ousted by local militias. Victims included Egyptian Copts, Ethiopians, Eritreans and a South Sudanese, the report said.

The report added that the armed groups affiliated to the IS, had claimed responsibility for the attacks, including on oil fields, checkpoints and petrol stations.