Home Reports The UN encourages Libyan factions to sign the agreement

The UN encourages Libyan factions to sign the agreement

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Mohamed Al-Dairy - Internet

The Libyan Foreign Minister, Mohamed Al-Dairy, said that an international meeting will be held in New York headed by United Nations Secretary General, Ban Ki-Moon, to encourage Libyan parties participating in talks to sign the document proposed by UN’s envoy to Libya, Bernardino Leon.

According to German News Agency, DPA, Al-dairy in his talk noted to the existence of 5000 Islamic State (IS) affiliates in Libya, distributed in Derna and Sirte cities, adding that, other groups in Tunisia expressed determination to move to Derna, in the context of the fight between IS and Al-Qaeda groups.

Al-Dairy said that the meeting, held with the participation of Leon, is to be a “Quantum leap” in the Libyan file that asserts on the international consensus, especially amongst Security Council members, about care about the Libyan case and the international encouragement to form a national accord government.

Al-Dairy accused parties in the General National congress, GNC, of deliberately blocking the completion of the national talks till after the October 20th, the term end date for the House of Representatives, HoR, in Tobrok, to question its legitimacy.

At the same time, Al-Dairy asserted that, the HoR term will be renewed automatically after October 20th, in accordance with the document signed by initial letters “to avoid any constitutional or institutional vacuum” in case talks weren’t accomplished by this date.

HoR also contains some privileged parties who, according to Al-Dairy, contribute to hindering reaching national accord government. Al-Dairy added that, this minority doesn’t want to lose its privileges, while pro-solution members form the overwhelming majority.

IS has been feeding of the battle between rival governments for control, gaining ground in Libya amid security vacuum after 4 years of toppling Muammar Gaddafi.

A security source told “Reuters” that IS militants attacked guards at a gate near Es Sider port, which is under the control of forces allied with the HoR government.

Since Last December, the terminal has been closed due to fighting with other rival armed factions and issues at supply oilfields.

“An attack was carried out by militants of Islamic State on a gate before sunset in the Es Sider area,” as said by Ali Hassi, spokesman for a local battalion of the Petroleum Facilities Guard.

One guard was killed and two wounded, he said, not covering details about how close the gate was to the port itself. Another attack was tried later with car bomb, the attack failed and four militants were shot dead.

Libya’s oil infrastructure has been deeply affected by the conflict; where rival armed factions, ranging from Islamist militants to tribal groups, often battle each other, besides protesters closing oilfields to demand jobs and payments.

Amid these circumstances, IS attacked oilfields and set up a base in Sirte. In March, the group attacked al-Ghani oilfield, and nine oil workers including foreigners were kidnapped there.

A major escalation by the group may be an attack against a key field or port like Es Sider. The port besides Ras Lanuf was main oil terminals; they have a combined capacity of around 600,000 barrels per day. Both have been closed since last December.

Western governments, concerned about the growing IS influence and the flow of illegal migrants from Libya’s coast, are pushing for the two rival governments to accept a United Nations-backed peace deal.